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Dressing Julian

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Julian Mouret is a vampire in my contemporary novel, Bloodroom. My upcoming historical vampire novel, The Bad Death, also stars Julian Mouret. Today I took the stock image photo I bought for the cast-of-characters animation on bloodroomthenovel.com and “dressed” it in 18th century clothing for the cast-of-characters animation to be featured on thebaddeath.com. This wasn’t quite as fun as dressing a good looking man for real, but it was still pretty fun.

The hottie in the tux is from istockphoto.com/. The young gent with the pistol is from 123rf.com. My challenge was to get Julian out of his tux and into the sharpshooter’s old-timey clothes. I used my Photoshop 6.0. I can just hear the hoots of incredulity. Yes, I use 12 year old software! It has all the features I need for simple image manipulation. If you don’t have Photoshop, Adobe now has an affordable monthly subscription service for its creative programs.

I’ll assume you know very little as I explain what I did here. I copied the sharpshooter into the tuxedo photo, which put it on its own layer so I could manipulate it independently. Really, the dressing trick amounted to resizing sharpshooter’s body to “fit” Julian’s. I used the pen tool to create a path around the cravat so that I could cut and paste it into its own layer. I used the transform tool to resize the cravat and torso. To fit the cravat “around” Julian’s chin, I used the lasso tool to free select portions I didn’t need and also used the eraser tool. Julian looks awfully fierce about his new outfit. Could be that moody sky; it fortells of vampires on the horizon.

I cut the sharpshooter out of the sky and dragged the halves of the sky together. Then I duplicated layers and played with the layers blending feature till I got this moody effect. The blending feature in the Layers palette makes the layer in question “react” to the layer beneath it for visual effect. I include a screenshot of my layers. You’ll see the selected layer has blending set to “Soft Light”. If you mess with enough layers’ blending features they all sort of affect each other, which can make for interesting results.


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